Tuesday, August 11, 2015

Coach Fish being interviewed this afternoon at 3pm EDT...

Hi, All:
Hope summer is going well.

If you find yourself really bored this afternoon, I'm being interviewed on a cable radio program.  Dr. Steve Clark is the former coach at Cal-Irvine, and radio host of a program dealing with the major issues in tennis.  This afternoon we'll be talking about the the growing significance of the Universal Tennis Ratings (universaltennis.com) and level-based play on all aspects of American tennis.

Regards,
Dave

Permalink: http://www.blogtalkradio.com/ur10snetwork/2015/08/11/coach-steve-clark-phd-show-guest-harvards-dave-fish-about-the-utr-and-more

--
Dave Fish
Scott Mead Family Head Coach of Men's Tennis
Harvard University Dept of Athletics
Murr Center
65 N. Harvard St.
Boston, MA 02163
fish@fas.harvard.edu
GoCrimson Men's Tennis website
Harvard Men's Tennis blog

Friday, July 10, 2015

Fwd: National Service Can Help Heal Our Nation

Hi, Everyone.  I hope you're having a good summer. 

I wanted to forward an article by John Bridgeland, who played for Harvard Tennis early in my career.  John  is CEO of Civic Enterprises, a public policy firm in Washington, D.C., and former director of the White House Domestic Policy Council in President George W. Bush's administration.   John is spearheading a project for National Civilian Service, an idea whose time has most definitely come.  

It's worth the read!  If you'd like to reach out to John, you can reach him at: bridge@civicenterprises.net

And please distribute if you are able!

Dave Fish
---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: John Bridgeland <bridge@civicenterprises.net>
Date: Fri, Jul 10, 2015 at 8:08 AM
Subject: National Service Can Help Heal Our Nation
To: John Bridgeland <bridge@civicenterprises.net>


We are trying to get this piece out far and wide.  We would be so grateful if you circulated to your networks.

All best — Bridge and Alan


John M. Bridgeland
CEO, Civic Enterprises
Co-Chair, Franklin Project at Aspen Institute
1110 Vermont Ave, NW, Suite 950
Washington, DC 20005
202.898.0310 (w) 


National service can help heal our nation

Volunteers Ashley Sparks and Kevin Barnett, both of Cleveland Heights, created paper snowmen in January 2013 with the children who lived at the Hattie Larlham Foundation in Streetsboro on National Service Day in America. The Franklin Project proposes putting civilian service on a par with military service in America. (Lonnie Timmons III, The Plain Dealer, File, 2013)
By Guest Columnist/cleveland.com 
on July 10, 2015 at 5:50 AM, updated July 10, 2015 at 5:51 AM
Reddit
John BridgelandCourtesy of John Bridgeland 
Alan KhazeiCourtesy of John Bridgeland 

Communities across America are fraying. Trust in one another and in key institutions are at their lowest levels in generations. We see the effects all around us — in places of tragedy such as Ferguson, Baltimore and Charleston; in places on the other side of the tracks where children of low- and middle-income families no longer do better than their parents; and in statehouses and Congress, where not knowing one another leads members to division and paralysis.

Americans lack opportunities for shared experiences that can remind us of our common heritage of both freedom and responsibility. 

Unlike so many generations before us that stepped up to serve in war and peace, we see an easy citizenship today, where a minority of Americans vote and a majority pay their taxes, but not much else is required. For the first time ever during war, less than 1 percent are serving in our military. Most of the indicators of the country's civic health are down dramatically over the last 40 years. 

America needs national service — opportunities for young Americans ages 18 to 28 to come together across lines of race, ethnicity, income, political affiliation and geography — to awaken our civic spirit. This is not some na├»ve notion, but fundamental to American identity and progress. Citizens are cultivated by shared experiences, not just born with entitlements.

The private sector is stepping up to do its part. Leaders in Silicon Valley are helping develop a Service Year Exchange that, for the first time, will qualify nonprofits, colleges and social enterprises to offer service year opportunities and enable young people to crowdfund to pay for their living stipends. Colleges will offer course credit. Employers will value national service credentials.

Private companies and foundations invest close to $1 billion in national service programs each year. President Barack Obama championed the bipartisan Serve America Act that authorized national service slots to grow to 250,000 a year.

The leadership council of the Franklin Project at The Aspen Institute — chaired by Gen. Stanley McChrystal and including former secretaries of State and Defense from Republican and Democratic administrations; U.S. senators from both parties; and leaders from the private sector, higher education, philanthropies and nonprofits — has signed on to a plan of action to provide 1 million service-year positions each year, which will put civilian national service on par with military service. They envision a future in which a year of full-time civilian national service is a common expectation and a civic rite of passage for all young Americans.

Yet Congress is proposing to devastate existing national service programs, such as AmeriCorps — an organization that President George H.W. Bush seeded, President Bill Clinton launched and President George W. Bush increased by 50 percent. 

Programs on the chopping block include those that support peer mentors and tutors who are doubling math and reading scores for students in some of the lowest-performing schools; that engage young people who are disconnected from school and work (costing taxpayers billions of dollars each year) to build homes for the poor and skills for themselves; and that reconnect veterans to college, work and community as they transition from war.

A House proposal would cut AmeriCorps membership from 80,000 to 40,000 and eliminate the National Civilian Community Corps as we approach the 10th anniversary of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, after which leaders of both parties lauded those corps as among the most effective responses. The Social Innovation Fund, which has leveraged three private dollars for every government dollar to support innovative solutions to public problems, would be ended. And 50,000 education awards for people who serve our country and earn some help to pay for college would be eliminated.

Congress is cutting the very programs that build citizens' trust among each other, solve problems and save taxpayers money.

American voters already get it. Despite concern about government spending, more than three in four (including 66 percent of Republicans) say that increasing funding for national service would be worthwhile. Eighty percent support voluntary large-scale national service.

A much deeper commitment to national service should be part of the response to tragedies in Ferguson, Baltimore, Charleston and other communities across America. Neighborhoods in Baltimore, such as Sandtown-Winchester/Harlem Park, have unemployment rates of up to 52 percent among 16- to 24-year-olds. Re-imagine those neighborhoods if the country offered national service positions to all of those young people to enlist their energy to contribute to their own community.

As debate swirls around the Confederate flag in South Carolina and other states, imagine how different it would be if young people spent a year in service working side-by-side with people of different backgrounds, as they do in national service programs such as City Year, Teach for America, Public Allies, LIFT, YouthBuild, Food Corps and Habitat for Humanity. We wonder what police-community relations would be like if more young people were working side-by-side in communities as they are in Anacostia with the Washington, D.C., Police Department to conserve rivers and parks.

Imagine what the U.S. Congress could do if more of its members had performed a year or more of national service working with people of different political beliefs.

We know national service works. As citizens, we are all stakeholders in the civic health of our nation. Let's call on Congress and the president to confront these troubled times with support for an American idea of shared renewal and join together in rebuilding a greater sense of "we" in our communities and country.

John Bridgeland, an Ohio native, is CEO of Civic Enterprises, a public policy firm in Washington, D.C., and former director of the White House Domestic Policy Council in President George W. Bush's administration. Alan Khazei is founder & CEO of Be the Change Inc. and co-founder of City Year. They are co-chairs of the Franklin Project on national service at The Aspen Institute.













--
Dave Fish
Scott Mead Family Head Coach of Men's Tennis
Harvard University Dept of Athletics
Murr Center
65 N. Harvard St.
Boston, MA 02163
fish@fas.harvard.edu
GoCrimson Men's Tennis website
Harvard Men's Tennis blog

Monday, June 29, 2015

Last chance to make a difference this year for Harvard Tennis! Good photos from NCAAs!



Hi Everyone,

We have only two days left in our fiscal year.  Let's push hard through the finish line and end with a banner year for Harvard Tennis.  

The link to donate is here.  Just select "Varsity Sports" from the Athletics Designation tab and select "Tennis" from the drop down menu.  

Thanks for all your support!  We couldn't do this without you.

Andrew and Dave

p.s. Remember your donations will count for class credit. 

--
Dave Fish
Scott Mead Family Head Coach of Men's Tennis
Harvard University Dept of Athletics
Murr Center
65 N. Harvard St.
Boston, MA 02163
fish@fas.harvard.edu
GoCrimson Men's Tennis website
Harvard Men's Tennis blog


Wednesday, June 24, 2015

HARVARD TENNIS' "CALL TO ACTION"


GRADUATING SENIORS SHAUN CHAUDHURI, DENIS NGUYEN, HENRY STEER, AND ALEX STEINROEDER - BEST WISHES!


Dear Harvard Tennis Family,

 

The end of Harvard fiscal year is upon us.  You know what to do.  Now is the time to step up to the short ball and finish off the point.  The link to donate is here.  Just select "Varsity Sports" from the Athletics Designation tab and select "Tennis" from the drop down menu.   If this simple reminder does not nudge you to give – please read below.

 

As coaches, we know that each player learns differently – some are visually learners, others need to be pushed, and still others need positive reinforcement.  Our job is to connect and speak to you individually, in your language.  For the purposes of this mass email, we offer you three different pitches – choose the one that suits you.

 

Soft (Emotional) Sell:

Read Shaun Chaudhuri's reflections of his four years at Harvard on the tennis team and remember the warm-fuzzy feelings of being back in college. 

 

Medium (Logical) Sell:

Here are some of our top priorities!  We need your help.

 

1.     Win the Ivy League and bring back the trophy to Cambridge where it belongs!  One step to accomplishing this mission is increasing our budget for recruiting.  We need your support to cover the gap from what the department provides. 

 2.     Jack Barnaby no longer drives us to spring break in North Carolina.  We fly – and it is expensive.  We continue to play the best teams in the country and these trips provide our players exposure, competition and opportunities to learn and grow.  This fall we are traveling to Texas A&M as well to Georgia for the Bulldog Invite and to William and Mary.  In the spring, we are going to the ITA Kick-Off at TCU, Nashville to play Vanderbilt and Memphis, as well as Spring Break in San Diego.  Several of these trips will include the entire roster.

3.     Strength and Conditioning consulting with Jez Green - one of the world's leading experts on training for tennis.  Jez worked for many years with Andy Murray and is now traveling with Thomas Berdych.  He provided a valuable boost in our program and is helping us to build these young boys into men. 

 

4.     Heart rate watch.   WHOOP is a new company that is making heart rate watches for high-end athletes like the Navy Seals, European football clubs, pro-sports teams.  Started by a Harvard squash player, these watches provide detailed information about sleep, recovery, rest, and workout strain, as it is the only watch that can measure heart rate variability – the best measurement of recovery.  We look forward to tracking our players throughout the season and mining the data for trends in our training, matches and especially monitoring players' sleep. 

 

 

Hard Sell (Dirty Harry approach) :

Think of all the great memories of van rides, spring break trips, Fish's endless metaphors, your teammates, the wins and loses…  And remember someone paid for all of that.  Now it is your turn.  If I wanted to go push harder, I would remind you that you might never have entered Johnson Gate in the first place without the support of the coaches.  Did you like Harvard?  Did it help your career?  Give back.  

 

Thanks for all of your support!

 

All the best from Cambridge,

Andrew and Dave


--
Dave Fish
Scott Mead Family Head Coach of Men's Tennis
Harvard University Dept of Athletics
Murr Center
65 N. Harvard St.
Boston, MA 02163
fish@fas.harvard.edu
GoCrimson Men's Tennis website
Harvard Men's Tennis blog

Wednesday, May 20, 2015

Harvard Tennis: NCAA Championship Update: live action today

Harvard Tennis:  NCAA Championship Update

Denis Nguyen plays today at 3:30pm EST against Minnesota's top gun, Leandro 
Toledo, in the first round of the NCAA individual championships in Waco, TX. You 
can watch the match live on the Baylor site.   The championship singles draw can be found here.   With rain in the forecast, the match times will probably change so 
check the site for updates.  

Denis Nguyen and Brian Yeung will be competing against University of South 
Florida's top duo Pramming-Robert in first round doubles action on Thursday.  For 
their draw, you can click here.   

In the NCAA Team event, HMT went down in an epic thriller to Northwestern 
Wildcats in Norman, Oklahoma.  It was a tough pill to swallow with two team match points on our racket to advance to the final 32 for the fourth straight year. The match included a thunderstorm delay that pushed us indoors.  At 2-2 in the last set of the last match, a tornado warning delay forced us into a shelter for a 45 minutes.  We were so proud of their fight and heart all year.  At that point, we thought we had seen it all.  Obviously, that was before we arrived in Waco on Sunday night!   

Congratulations to Conor Haughey and Nicky Hu for being voted Co-Captains by their teammates for the upcoming 2015-16 season.  They are both deserving and will be great representatives of the HMT tradition.

Dave, Andrew and Tim
--
Dave Fish
Scott Mead Family Head Coach of Men's Tennis
Harvard University Dept of Athletics
Murr Center
65 N. Harvard St.
Boston, MA 02163
fish@fas.harvard.edu
GoCrimson Men's Tennis website
Harvard Men's Tennis blog

Friday, April 24, 2015

#34 Harvard Men’s Tennis (19-6): News and Views

#34 Harvard Men's Tennis (19-6): News and Views

 

In this issue:

Crimson beats Bulldogs and Bears 5-2

Dartmouth Rivalry this Saturday

 

Harvard vs. Yale

This past Friday, HMT travelled south on I-84 into the Bulldogs lair for the oldest of rivalries.  We had several legendary alums on hand, including Tim Hartch ('92) and Billy Stanley ('87) lending their support to the cause.  It was a rough start in doubles where Yale jumped on us from the opening bell with wins at #1 and #3.  Trailing 1-0 in the team score, the singles began with an improved focus and intensity.   At #2, Nicky Hu let loose a flurry of winners from his heavy forehand and strong one-handed backhand to notch the first win for the visitors.  Big boy (6' 5") Sebastian Beltrame put Harvard ahead at #3 with a straight set win, using his serve and forehand to control the court.  After Denis Nguyen was ambushed by Yale's terrific sophomore, Tyler Lu at the top singles spot, senior captain Alex Steinroeder would put us up 3-1 with a crafty win in the third set.  (Alex' game is what my old coach Lawrence Klieger termed the "veggie-matic" – relying on slices, dices, chops, cuts…  Alex has a big forehand and fantastic touch around the net.  But he is most known for his Tilden-esque backhand and forehand slices – indeed a lost art!   He finds a way to make his opponent uncomfortable with balls out of their strike zone, whether with an arching moon ball or deft angle drop shot.)  Freshman Kenny Tao would wrap up the day with a three-set win at #6 to secure a 5-2 victory. 

 

Harvard vs. Brown

Back in Cambridge last Sunday, the Crimson faced off on Senior Day against the Brown Bears.  After re-jiggering the doubles line-up, we finally won a doubles point in convincing fashion 3-0.   With a one point lead, the singles would quickly fall in our favor with straight set wins at #2, #5, #6.  Senior Co-Captain Alex Steinroeder clinched the win for the Crimson.  The remaining matches would all be close.  Denis Nguyen eked out a win against a tough senior at #1, but we dropped close matches at #3 and #4, to finish with a 5-2 victory.   

 

Crimson vs. Big Green

This Saturday is our final match of the regular season is against Dartmouth in Hanover at 2pm.  Harvard in second place, Dartmouth tied with Cornell for third place.  NCAA and bragging rights at stake!  Stay tuned! 


Our four seniors: Chaudhuri, Steinroeder, Nguyen and Steer!  We'll miss you!


And a group photo in front of New Haven's famous pizza place, Pepe's!  I'm still chewing!




--
Dave Fish
Scott Mead Family Head Coach of Men's Tennis
Harvard University Dept of Athletics
Murr Center
65 N. Harvard St.
Boston, MA 02163
fish@fas.harvard.edu
GoCrimson Men's Tennis website
Harvard Men's Tennis blog

Thursday, April 16, 2015

HMT #34: Yale and Brown on tap this weekend/Senior Day on Sunday

 


​Frosh Kenny Tao and Grant Solomon taking charge...


In this issue:

Yale and Brown on Tap

Harvard downs #35 Princeton and Penn

Crimson Beats #48 Cornell but Falls to #22 Lions in Epic Battle

 

Yale and Brown on Tap

 

The Crimson heads south on I-95 tomorrow, Friday, to face the Yale Bulldogs at 1pm in New Haven.   Come out and support the team if you live in the area.  Sunday is Senior Day in Cambridge as we square off in the last home match of the season against the Brown Bears at 1pm.  Help us send off H'15s Henry Steer, Alex Steinroeder, Shaun Chaudhuri and Denis Nguyen in style! 

 

Harvard downs #35 Princeton and Penn

 

Last weekend, the Netters travelled to Penn and Princeton for a pivotal Ivy weekend.  Despite a blustery Philly day, we were able to hold off the Quakers 5-2 with strong performances from our freshmen – Kenny Tao (#5 singles), Grant Solomon (#6 singles) and Jean Thirouin (#2 doubles), who all garnered wins on the day. 

 

On Sunday, we faced off for the third time this season against the Tigers.  We had beaten them 4-2 at our place in the ECAC tournament and lost to them 4-3 on spring break.  This would be another heated contest.   Princeton started strong and won the doubles point with great wins at 1 & 3 doubles positions.   In singles, it would again come down to the wire.  Denis Nguyen and Sebastian Beltrame would give the Crimson two wins at #1 and #3 respectively, while Grant Solomon fell to an inspired Tiger at #6, which knotted the match at 2-2.  There was still plenty of drama left.   Nicky Hu got up two match points in the second set – but that was as close as he was to come, as he succumbed to full body cramps in the third.  Meanwhile, Brian Yeung was in the third set when his opponent fell and twisted his ankle – leaving him hobbled for the final frame.  Point to Harvard.  Now the match was 3-3.  On the upper courts, freshman Kenny Tao was playing for all the marbles, but had lost his first set.  Ironically, his Tiger opponent, Luke Gamble, had clinched the decider only a few weeks earlier on spring break.  Kenny plays with penetrating groundstrokes off both wings (in the mold of Derek Brown for all you older fans).  With Coach Fish counseling him to stay aggressive and come forward, Kenny was able hold his nerves in check and serve out the match to clinch the team win!    Click here for a full wrap up and all the scores.

 

Crimson Beats #48 Cornell but Falls to #22 Lions in Epic Battle

 

In the first Ivy weekend of matches, the Crimson topped a tough Cornell team 4-3, before failing to the Lions 5-2 at the Murr.  The Lions are having an incredible year, led by four seniors whom we we will be happy to see graduate!  It was another fantastic match with great crowd support and fantastic tennis.  The doubles point came down to the wire.  Our top pairing of Denis Nguyen and Brian Yeung, who are ranked #17 in the country, won quickly and put us ahead, but Columbia countered, edging out wins at #2 & #3 to secure the doubles point.  In singles, five of the six matches would be three set affairs, with all the matches up for grabs.  Nicky Hu was up a set and break only to fall at #2.  Sebastian Beltrame would save match points at #3 and battle back to victory while Grant Solomon did the same by saving one match point in the second to win.  Suffice to say, it was a barnburner, with both teams leaving it all out on the court.  Needless to say, while disappointed we couldn't pull off an upset, we were very proud of our guys.

 

You can find all the scores and highlights here.


Andrew Rueb

  


--
Dave Fish
Scott Mead Family Head Coach of Men's Tennis
Harvard University Dept of Athletics
Murr Center
65 N. Harvard St.
Boston, MA 02163
fish@fas.harvard.edu
GoCrimson Men's Tennis website
Harvard Men's Tennis blog